Author Archives: Adam Meads

Moving on up

They say that necessity is the mother of invention, so when we learned that publishers were required to update their article pages to keep in line with revised search engine specifications, we took the opportunity for a little reinvention.

We were informed that we needed to move the abstract further up the article page, to aid search engine crawlers to index pages as efficiently as possible. Coincidently, this was something that we had already been thinking about as you would have seen in our previous blog post. We wanted our users to get to the content (the thing that they are interested in) as quickly and as smoothly as possible.

We listen to every bit of feedback that we receive from our users, and hoard these little nuggets of insight to ensure that when we make changes, we deliver things that are both relevant and useful. As we were having to make some changes, we decided to go back through everything we had related to the article page, and incorporate some of these suggestions and fix any problems that our users face.

Pre re-design

In a happy coincidence, the overwhelming theme in the feedback, was that the position of the original header box containing the journal information was forcing the content too far down the page. Meaning that it was hidden from view. Our users wanted the content in plain sight, they wanted it above the fold so that they could see it without having to scroll down.

So, at the risk of using too many sayings, we decided to kill two birds with one stone and move the journal information section to the right-hand column of the page. This then meant that the content was immediately accessible, and naturally created a section of tools and information relating to the article, to the right of the page.

 

This is not just an issue on Emerald Insight, even some of the biggest sites in the world experience this same problem due to different browser sizes and windows restricting visibility. Here are a couple of blog posts from staff at Google discussing the problem:

http://googlecode.blogspot.co.uk/2009/12/introducing-google-browser-size.html

https://search.googleblog.com/2012/01/page-layout-algorithm-improvement.html

 

 

 

 

 

 


Explore Emerald Insight on the move

This week sees the launch of our new ‘responsive’ version of Emerald Insight, so grab your mobile and take a look.

I say ‘responsive’ because it won’t completely expand and contract fluidly regardless of the display size, it will snap into place because the page is serving something different depending on the device it is viewed on.

So what? you may think. It’s all just semantics. Well, we want you to know that this is a long-term project and the first in a long line of releases. We may be constrained a little by some platform issues, but we will continue to iterate and improve the site regardless, with future enhancements based on the feedback from our users – i.e. you.

Now that we can offer a tailored mobile experience, we feel we’ve made a big step forward, but we don’t want to stop there. Currently every piece of functionality that exists on the desktop site, is also visible in the mobile experience. Does it all need to be there? Could we strip some of it out? Can we hide elements and present a lighter and more streamlined user experience?

Over the coming months, we will be embarking on rounds of user testing across the globe. Tapping into the expertise of those who interact with our site and products, in order to truly hone the mobile experience and provide our users with all that they need to get the most from Emerald Insight on the move.

So what are you waiting for? Pick up your mobile and have a flick through the site. If you have any comments, thoughts or ideas, please get in touch. Any and all feedback is useful, we would love to hear from you.


Heigh ho, Heigh ho, it’s off data mining we go

As a publisher, we want to meet the needs of researchers and academics who interact with our site to ensure that we offer the best user experience and functionality possible. With this in mind, we began a project to facilitate text and data mining on emeraldinsight.com, following requests from individuals and institutions in recent months.

So what is text and data mining, or TDM as it is often shortened to? Well, it is the analysis of large bodies of work by a machine, to try and identify trends that would not ordinarily be picked up through usual ‘human’ reading. For example, the processing of data contained in a large collection of scientific papers in a particular medical field could suggest a possible link between a gene and a disease, or between a drug and an adverse effect – things that a human would never piece together after reading thousands of articles.

Mine

With so much amazing content on our site, it was an obvious decision to enable this functionality. Hopefully by doing so, it will spark further ideas and research and perhaps even change the world!.. Okay, we are maybe getting a bit ahead of ourselves, but it is still a good thing that it is now available.

Having investigated a number of different options as to how we could do this, we decided to go with a solution that involved the use of CrossRef’s TDM facility. This meant adding additional data into current and future deposits with CrossRef, along with depositing a huge tranche of historical information. So far, we have provided data for over 200,000 articles, and this number will continue to grow over forthcoming weeks. We have also enabled access to the equivalent number of machine-readable files on our site.

Users wishing to mine the site are encouraged to inform us of their intention to do so, so they are not automatically blocked by our system. There are also the usual access restrictions in place, so a user will still have to be a subscriber to the content. But aside from those minor caveats, we encourage our users to use the facility and mine for that one diamond of information that is just waiting to be discovered.


A new little feature for the Mendeley fans out there

We know that researchers love Mendeley – the free reference manager and academia’s answer to LinkedIn. Academics can use it to (in Mendeley’s words) “manage your research, showcase your work, connect and collaborate with over five million researchers worldwide”. So, if you’re a Mendeley fan, we want to make it as easy as possible for you to save an Emerald journal article or book chapter to your personal Mendeley library.

We had the option there to do that on Emerald Insight already, but it was hidden as a tiny social share button in the ‘plus others’ section of our social share list on article pages, so it was pretty hard to find. The first thing we’ve done to fix this is make the Mendeley button appear in that social share list, alongside the share to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn buttons down the right-hand column of the article pages.

The Mendeley button

However, the more interesting and useful thing we’ve done is create a big new button right at the top of the article page – you can’t really miss it! But here’s a screenshot to prove it anyway.

mendeley

So now it’s super quick and easy to save all your favourite Emerald journal articles straight to your Mendeley library. We’re still working on rolling the buttons out to book pages, but in the meantime, we hope you find this new little feature useful!